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Sorry for all the trouble getting to the Facebook pages. I obviously haven't used a forum like this for some time.

Here is the original article we posted:

This week in New York's American Revolution History...

March 11, 2012 – Sullivan-Clinton Cannon found in Otego?

A fisherman trolling the upper Susquehanna River in Otsego County, NY spots an unusually-shaped, rusty object in the mud near a sharp bend in the river less than a mile northeast of the village of Otego. Several months later, F.J. “Buzz” Hesse, auctioneer and noted Indian artifacts collector from the village, receives phone call about the object. Intrigued, he investigates further. The object, which is only 27 inches long, weighs in at over 257 pounds. It turns out to be a cannon – its 2-inch bore makes it about a 1-pounder. How does a cannon end up in the river near Otego?

Hesse, who grew up in Endicott, Deposit, Sidney & Unadilla, has an Anthropology degree from SUNY Oneonta, but during the late 1960’s & early 1970’s, he did archaeological field work. He conducted excavations with the NYS Museum, and contributed to the 2-volume work “The Pre-History of the Upper Susquehanna River Basin” by Dr. Robert E. Funk, NY State Archaeologist. He also independently excavated and reported on eleven sites in the region, including the Haudenosaunee Village of Unadilla, which had been burned by combined forces of the Continental Army and New York Militia in 1778.

Hesse's hypothesis is that the cannon could have been from a battaeau that capsized while floating downstream towards Tioga Point (Athens, PA) as part of the Clinton leg of the Sullivan Expedition in August, 1779.

Not everyone has yet agreed with this assessment, but as of October, 2013, retired teacher and museum curator Dr. Richard M. Gramly had planned to collaborate on an article about the cannon for a military history journal. Gramly, who is a Harvard-educated Anthropologist and Organizer of The American Society for Amateur Archaeology, is also known for his archaeological work. Although his specialty has been ancient native American sites in the northeast, Gramly agreed with Hesse's assessment.

A more detailed article about the find can be read in October 3, 2013 issue of Cooperstown's “The Freeman’s Journal” at this link:

https://1drv.ms/b/s!AikeZa9TlOgChFnwvOlXqfKH_mVd

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