CMH Forum

[WW I] Military Service Plaque

I have been asked about what appears to me to be a commercially-made military service commemorative plaque, 9" in diameter,lamenated under celluloid or plastic in bright colors, with flags and eagle and military scenes surrounding a photograph of a soldier in American army uniform and "campaign" hat. Heading is "The Great World War for Democracy, Liberty and Justice" with a stirring statement attributed to Woodrow Wilson. Attachment or display device on reverse is missing, so I'm unclear whether intended to be hung or set up easel-fashion. A paper with it dated 1906 suggests that the picture is that of a Raymond Rice, and a quick Google search showed a man of that name who served in Co. L, 325 Infantry, with tombstone dates 1892-1966.
The questioner had been told by someone that this was a rare "death plaque," but I see nothing to suggest a memorial of anything other than honorable service.
This appears to me to be the sort of thing noted in Civil War, Span-Am and other instances (even today) in which military service is displayed on colorful form "suitable for framing," and which, in olden days, were sold by itinerant artists, ready to individualize pre-printed forms. Is the item described known to specialist-collectors, so that I might be more definitive in replying?

Messages In This Thread

[WW I] Military Service Plaque
Re: [WW I] Military Service Plaque
CMH Minuteman

To Join the Company of Military Historians click here

CMH Minuteman